Our Intent, Implementation and Impact

Intent: Our purpose and ambition

The English curriculum underpins the entire school curriculum by developing students’ abilities to speak, listen and communicate and to think, explore and organise. An effective English curriculum should take a central role in curriculum planning across the school because it provides students with the skills required to access all other subject areas and engage in academic thinking.  This includes helping students to understand ideas and question them, and to express themselves successfully orally and in writing. 

Building on KS2

The English department is developing strong links with our feeder primaries through a series of taster days and on-going dialogue with primary literacy co-ordinators.  Our teachers have good knowledge and understanding of the early years, KS1 and KS2 curriculums and have recently been conversing with Rudston Primary on ways in which the KS2 spelling, punctuation and grammar test can best be embedded into students’ writing practice.

Our KS3 curriculum seeks to develop the prior knowledge and skills acquired at KS2 in order to ensure a smooth transition into KS3 and beyond.  We plan for progression by seeking to develop the technical knowledge and comprehension skills learned in KS2 into a set of effective thinking and communication skills that serve our students holistically across the curriculum.  Learning in Y7 is devised with the KS2 curriculum as a starting point and teachers consult the available question level analysis from the KS2 reading test in their initial assessment of student knowledge.  We work closely with our SEN department to undertake tracked catch-up programmes for learners who have not met expected levels in English at the end of KS2.

In conjunction with Kings College, London, our Y7 students follow a metacognition programme called Let’s Think in English.

Enrichment Outside the Classroom

The English department regularly organise theatre trips and visiting authors to enable our students to experience live theatre and engage with writers about their work.  We encourage students to read widely beyond our curriculum and share recommended reading and books through our Big Little Library. We annually celebrate World Book Day with a whole school theme.  Past themes have included Roald Dahl, Harry Potter and fairy tales.

Implementation: Design, Pedagogy and Assessment

In English lessons we seek to:

  • develop critical and creative thinking for every student;
  • develop in every student an enjoyment and appreciation of the power of language and literature;
  • provide learning experiences which allow every student to gain communicative competence in listening and talking;
  • provide learning experiences which allow every student to gain competence in reading to allow students access to the full curriculum;
  • provide learning experiences that foster a culture of reading for both learning and pleasure by providing students with access to a range of texts from the English literary heritage and world literature written in English;
  • provide learning experiences which allow every student to gain competence in writing for a range of purposes;
  • provide learning experiences that develop an academic register in speech and writing and a wide ranging and extensive vocabulary;
  • provide learning experiences that give students opportunities to explore and share ideas creatively and persuasively through spoken and written language;
  • provide learning experiences that provide opportunities to revisit and develop prior knowledge;
  • provide learning experiences which allow personal,interpersonal and team-working skills, which are so important in life and in the world of work, to flourish for every student;
  • provide learning experiences that increase the cultural capital of every student.

We aspire to be a leading department that models best practice for the whole school.

In what ways does our curriculum help to develop…?

  • Cultural diversity and identity: range of texts studied across KS3 and 4 explore a variety of cultures and identities.
  • Physically and mentally healthy lifestyles: Y8 transactional writing unit involves the research of healthy lifestyles.  The range of topics covered for transactional and persuasive writing includes those focusing on healthy lifestyle choices.
  • Community participation: the department has developed links with visiting writers and theatre groups.
  • Careers and enterprise:  English develops the necessary communication skills in speaking, reading and writing that are central to all aspects of the labour market. 
  • Technology and the media: students regularly use technology for research purposes.  A range of media texts and formats are studied across the key stages.
  • Creativity and critical thinking: From Y7’s Let’s Think in English

 

IMPACT: Attainment, Progress, Knowledge, Skills and Destinations

What forms do assessments take? What is the purpose of assessment?

Formative assessments include:

  • Regular use of teacher questioning
  • Baseline tasks
  • Class based self and peer assessments
  • Class based teacher assessments – including 3 formal assessment points (APs) and half-termly shorter Teacher Assessment points (TAs)

The primary purpose of assessments is to track the effectiveness of teaching and learning in order to inform future planning and gain a picture of istudent progress.

 

How do we know if we have a successful curriculum?

  • Opinion data from student voice, observations, pop-ins, departmental meetings and parent evenings.
  • Quantitative data from internal tracking and external examination results

Year 7

  • Embed the knowledge of spelling, punctuation and grammar taught at KS2 into students’ writing.
  • Write an engaging and effectively structured narrative that uses a range of descriptive and figurative devices to engage the reader.
  • Consider how writers of prose narratives use a range of techniques to explore themes and develop characters.
  • Read a work by Shakespeare and develop an appreciation of his cultural significance.
  • Read a range of poetry and explore a range of poetic techniques and their effects.
  • Recognise a range of figurative devices across poetry, prose and drama and begin to discuss their effect on the construction of meaning.  Begin to apply the use of figurative language in own writing.
  • To write a formal essay in response to literary texts following academic conventions including:

-       the use of formal standard English;

-       an apt selection of textual reference to evidence ideas;

-       emerging discussion of how language is used to construct meaning;

-       the application of subject terminology.

  • Recognise the features of non-fiction texts.
  • Write for transactional purposes to express a viewpoint using rhetorical devices.
  • Express ideas, information and feelings using spoken Standard English with an attempt to organise and structure talk to meet the needs of an audience.

Year 8

  • Use accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar to ensure clarity in writing.
  • Taking consideration of the conventions of genre, write an engaging and effectively structured narrative that uses a range of descriptive and figurative devices to engage the reader.
  • Analyse how writers of prose narratives use a range of techniques to explore themes and develop characters.
  • Read a work by Shakespeare, develop an appreciation of his cultural significance and explore how language and stage craft are used to create meaning.
  • Read a range of poetry and explore a range of poetic techniques and analyse their effects.
  • Recognise a range of figurative devices across poetry, prose and drama and examine their effect on the construction of meaning.  Apply the use of figurative language in own writing.
  • To write a formal essay in response to literary texts following academic conventions including:

-       the use of formal standard English;

-       an apt selection of textual reference to evidence ideas;

-       analysis of how language is used to construct meaning;

-       the accurate application of subject terminology.

  • Recognise the features of non-fiction texts and discuss their purposes and effects.
  • Write for transactional purposes to express a viewpoint using rhetorical devices effectively.
  • Express ideas, information and feelings using spoken Standard English with a clear organisation and structure to meet the needs of an audience.

Year 9

  • Use accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar to ensure clarity in writing and create deliberate effects.
  • Taking consideration of the conventions of genre, write an engaging and narrative that uses a range of descriptive and figurative devices to engage the reader and uses structure to support meaning and create deliberate effects.
  • Closely analyse how writers of prose narratives use a range of techniques to explore themes and develop characters.
  • Read a work by Shakespeare, appreciating his cultural significance and analyse how language and stage craft are used to create meaning.
  • Read a range of poetry exploring how poetic techniques and used to create meaning and effects.
  • Recognise a range of figurative devices across poetry, prose and drama and analyse their effect on the construction of meaning.  Apply the use of figurative language imaginatively in own writing.
  • To write a formal essay in response to literary texts following academic conventions including:

-       the use of formal standard English;

-       an apt selection of textual reference to evidence ideas;

-       analysis of how language is used to construct meaning;

-       the accurate application of subject terminology.

  • Recognise and evaluate the features of non-fiction texts and discuss their purposes and effects.
  • Write for transactional purposes to express a viewpoint logically using rhetorical devices effectively.
  • Structure and organise ideas, information and feelings using spoken Standard English to engage an audience.